Shawty Got Skillz

Cause Shawties Got Skillz

3,453 notes

blackwomenworldhistory:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks because:

Message from S. Morishita:

I wanted to share my body-positive comic that I’m currently running a kickstarter to help raise funds to get it in print and purchase the ISBN number to get it in bookstores. 

Love! Love! Fighting! follows the story of Oriana who is having difficulties handling the friction within her family. Now that she has recently been fired from her job her little cousin decides to trick her back to her mother and fathers home country. Krisa’s plan is to possibly find some kind of way into the lime light while Oriana is still trying to mend the patch with her family but with stress piling up and also the fact that she’s never really lived her life for herself but always for others, she’s having a hard time finding her own place in life and it’s slowly tearing her down on the inside.

I really want to cover different topics about beauty and family with a touch of fluffy romance and a whole lot of comedy. There aren’t really a lot of Asian men, black women pairing and if their are it’s very rare to have anyone be plus size and also have the story not centered totally on her being big. I want to tell a story with a girl that has a lot of other problems to deal with besides the fact that she is plus size. I really hope that this story can help encourage and strength other young or older women. This story has also been a help for me to build back up my own confidence because I struggle with a lot of things but I want to keep telling myself that it’s going to be alright and this story is a way for me to vent my frustration and encourage myself at the same time.

Here’s the kickstarter link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1524977703/love-love-fighting-vol-1-and-2

I really hope that the kickstarter is a success. I would love to get these in some of the local libraries that I’ve been to and some of the book stores as well.  I’ve had such a hard time with trying to get other peoples interest in my story but you just keep working hard and making the stories that you love, even if your the only one that loves them.

support!!! BOOST !!!! you want o see more of this stuff WELL SUPPORT YOU INDIE SELF PUB AUTHORS!

159,642 notes

blackphoenix77:

angryasiangirlsunited:

iseemtobeaverb:

continueplease:

nbcnews:

Teen’s invention could charge your phone in 20 seconds
(Photo: Intel)
Waiting hours for a cellphone to charge may become a thing of the past, thanks to an 18-year-old high-school student’s invention. She won a $50,000 prize Friday at an international science fair for creating an energy storage device that can be fully juiced in 20 to 30 seconds.
Read the complete story.

Everybody, remember this face.Remember this name.If this becomes a commonly used & highly lauded discovery, at some point a White guy is going to take credit, even if he has to word it like “Improved upon a previous…”No no noFuck that guy.Remember this brown girl.Remeeeemmmmmberrrrr


What about her name? I keep seeing this all over my dashboard, but I’ve never seen it with her name in the actual post and not just in the link.
Eesha Khare. That’s who she is. Not just “Nameless-brown-girl-who-made-something.”

EESHA KHARE KICKING ASS!

I need this in my life

blackphoenix77:

angryasiangirlsunited:

iseemtobeaverb:

continueplease:

nbcnews:

Teen’s invention could charge your phone in 20 seconds

(Photo: Intel)

Waiting hours for a cellphone to charge may become a thing of the past, thanks to an 18-year-old high-school student’s invention. She won a $50,000 prize Friday at an international science fair for creating an energy storage device that can be fully juiced in 20 to 30 seconds.

Read the complete story.

Everybody, remember this face.
Remember this name.
If this becomes a commonly used & highly lauded discovery, at some point a White guy is going to take credit, even if he has to word it like “Improved upon a previous…”
No no no
Fuck that guy.
Remember this brown girl.
Remeeeemmmmmberrrrr

image

What about her name? I keep seeing this all over my dashboard, but I’ve never seen it with her name in the actual post and not just in the link.

Eesha Khare. That’s who she is. Not just “Nameless-brown-girl-who-made-something.”

EESHA KHARE KICKING ASS!

I need this in my life

(via queergiftedblack)

861 notes

Sober Spaces and Accessibility in the Queer Community

fabianswriting:

fabianswriting:

I am a queer Chican@ Immigrant and a chronically ill person with able bodied privilege. 

Being sober means that I rarely ever go out to clubs or events unless I can drag along a sober friend. I have gone out before without that support and I end up feeling overwhelmed and panicky. I need at least a friend with me that will agree to not drink or use substances while we spend time together. In the past this has saved me by knowing that I have someone to be accountable to (I will stay sober) and that I have someone that understands when I feel tempted or miss drinking and using. 

Tonight I went dancing. My body missed it so much. I did my awkward shuffle, my cumbia inspired body movements and let my arms relax into the music. It was 90’s dance night at a small club. On the dance floor were awkward people trying to dance while balancing drinks on their hands, bad lip synching, or standing in the middle of the dance floor and talking loudly over the music. It was refreshing to see so many people dancing. We left right as it got crowded, our strategy for limiting time around drunk people.

I went with my sober white friend, I joke that she is the only person in the world that wears crocs but she isn’t. She is however one of the few people I really spend time with in Seattle. Seattle is very white and although the people of color community here is tight, most of us are introverts spend a lot of time alone and only hang when at events centered around alcohol or drugs.

I am shy and I am sick off and on due to multiple serious allergies although when I am not I still often times stay in. It is heartbreaking how little I go out. But I know that sober spaces are often not considered or mentioned as an accessibility issue. I have to decide before any event whether or not I have enough energy to deal with the pot or alcohol smell (if I am not doing well it is triggering), the offerings (it is so uncomfortable), the glorification of drug and alcohol use and the drunk or high people. Most of the time I opt out. I find it easier to spend time alone then have to spend my energy trying to navigate nights of sober inaccessibility; and I am bad at navigation. I am still building skills to function as a sober person in this world and I have been sober for 4 years. 

But really though, who has the skills to navigate the drunk culture that queers live in all the time? Like myself most sober queers that I know choose to opt out of going out even when they want to.  It’s sad to feel that the connections I make with other queers of color are often blocked off by this unnecessary barrier or occasionally tolerated without trying to understand it. Often times I am asked to accommodate drinking or drug use and I have become used to it; but I still wonder why is it that a recovering addict and alcoholic be exposed to the substances that could’ve have killed them in order to hang out with friends? 

When I say that I am recovering I mean that I am one of the 45% of the LGBTQ community that has struggled or is currently struggling with alcoholism (compared to 15% of the general population) and that does not differentiate between race or gender. Studies suggest that “stress of dealing with stigma and bias also manifests in high rates of substance abuse among gay and transgender people of color” that varies with the intersections of oppressions that we face. We have a lot to de-stress from as people who face different forms of oppression daily, don’t we want to learn how to support each other in different ways of coping too?

I am often times disappointed by the lack of compassion that I get for my requests for sober space in queer communities. I am often times disappointed by the lack of support that I receive by my queer people of color when it comes to my sobriety. I do not want to have to share my sob story to receive compassion or expose my scary and vulnerable drinking past to be understood. I want my people to see this as real, as a something to consider. I want there to be communication that can lead to compromise. For example I know friends who use substances for pain management but will do it before we hang out or after, or in a different room if I am around. 

Right now an uncle of mine is dying of cirrhosis of the liver in Mexico. I have lost more people than I can count to alcohol related death or overdosing, I came close to being one of them. I want to be clear that I am not a staunch abstinence-is-the-only way to recover from addiction person but I know that it is what I need and I am not alone. I know people who are not sober but limit their time around drinking or drug use as harm reduction for their use of substances. I also know children of alcoholics and addicts who are not sober but cannot be in spaces that trigger memories of their neglectful or abusive childhoods. I also know youth who have never used and don’t want to and people who just don’t like being around it.

I believe that having more consideration for sober spaces not only will nurture relationships with recovering addicts, it also will be more accessible to youth and will build more skills around de-stressing and coping with the microaggressions that we face daily; More importantly it will start conversations about the people who are not hanging out because of inaccessibility. I dream of a world where I can be with my differently abled friends more than once a year. I want to be able to talk not only about how sober spaces are not considered in queer spaces but how it is connected to the ways that ableism runs our lives and how our attitudes toward ableism keeps disabled people isolated. This is only one way that the queer community can improve, there are many ways that ableism separates us, consider learning about those too. 

Mia Mingus’s Blog

This Ain’t Living Blog

Myths and Facts about Chemical Disabilities by Peggy Munson

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha’s Blog

Access Culture: Queer Crip Commentary 

I write this to honor my ancestors, to honor those who struggle with addiction and alcoholism and to love all my people. 

Fabian Romero

please help me get to the Allied Media Conference to present my Radical Queer Sober workshop this year if you can. i won’t be able to go without your support. 

(via poc-creators)

1,161,532 notes

luna-nix:

whoufflesoufflegirl:

the-treble:

willowpedia:

crazymolerat36:

ewitsmichelle:

not just followers, everyone.

same

I’m here if any of you need to talk<3

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The best part is, this post actually does something, it offers support, unlike one of those useless “reblog if you care” posts.

Exactly. Which is why I’ll reblog this one.

(Source: cali4niadreaming, via bitteroreo)